Archive | Biomedical Autism Intervention

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Biomedical Autism Treatment – Biomedicine University and Autism

Posted on 10 April 2012 by admin

If you like the information that I put forth in these videos and if you’ve joined me on my webinars through Great Plains Laboratory which I do once a month on a Wednesday, usually at the beginning of the month but make sure you check with Great Plains Laboratory for the schedule for each webinar regarding a specific topic on biomedical intervention. Then if you like the information I put forth I think you’ll also then like having access to this information through a website we’ve created called www.biomedicineuniversity.com.

What I have done is I’ve gone through many of my most popular presentations, redone the slides, we’ve converted those into a color PDF that you can immediately have as a download. Many of those presentations are also recorded as an audio file and then merged together essentially as a movie file that you can access as well.

Some things that I have done recently, one particular topic called Brain Regions and their Dysfunction in Autism goes through in depth the different areas in the brain. The frontal lobe, the temporal lobe, the parietal lobe, the occipital lobe, etc. and looking at different areas that are often dysfunctional in Autism and try and get a better understanding of what’s happening at that neuro-anatomical level. So that has been a popular one.

Another presentation I have done is brain inflammation, specifically brain inflammation with respects to microglia, microglia being these immune cells in the brain that are often activated in Autism leading to chronic inflammation. That information is there as well. But there is a whole host of other presentations on yeast, on biofilms, on supplements, on oxytocin, cholesterol, Respen-A therapy, methyl B-12 therapy, etc. So if you want to keep abreast of the information I am putting out, certainly join me at www.greatplainslaboratory.com once a month for my webinars and you can register through Great Plains Laboratory. And then you have constant access to information as well through www.biomedicineuniversity.com.

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Autism Treatment – Pandas, Probiotic Problems and Autism

Posted on 08 January 2012 by admin

PANDAS, PROBIOTICS PROBLEMS AND AUTISM
One phenomenon that I have seen with a number of kids on the Autism spectrum–some kids aren’t necessarily classically diagnosed with Autism but who have the characteristics of something called PANDAS–is a condition in the body that is triggered by a streptococcal infection, specifically Group A Beta Hemolytic Strep. In this case, individuals develop obsessive compulsive behavior, sometimes tics, behavioral issues, weird or odd movements of the head or the eyes, side glancing, or different manifestations that usually come about after an infection, sometimes a sore throat. It can be a marked change in their behavior, social anxiety, anxiety in general and as mentioned before very, very severe forms of obsessive compulsive disorder.

Now there are certain individuals on the Autism spectrum who have this characteristic and there are also other people who develop obsessive compulsive behavior and tics etc, who also have PANDAS but are not Autistic. One of the things that is interesting is in many of the supplements that people take, specifically probiotics, there is a specific bacteria called streptococcus thermophilus that is a natural bacteria and is essentially listed as a beneficial bacterial for the digestive system and for our overall health. You also find it in some yogurt products as well. It’s reported that streptococcus thermophilus is entirely different than Group A Beta Hemolytic Strep as far as its protein structure and therefore should not be a contributing problem to the obsessive compulsive problems or the other manifestation of PANDAS. The problem is that has not always proved to be true. This basically means in many kids, whether they are on the Autism spectrum or not, just don’t seem to react very well to probiotics that have streptococcus thermophilus.

If you have a suspicion that your child has PANDAS or is likely a problem, check their probiotics. See if the probiotics that they are taking have streptococcus thermophilus. If it does, consider changing to a different probiotic. It doesn’t always fit, but often times it does.

I had a situation a couple of years ago where a patient who had PANDAS was successfully treated for it and was essentially in remission started a group of new supplements, and all of a sudden, started coming down with those PANDAS conditions again. Anxiety, tics, obsessive behavior. The parent didn’t realize that the streptococcus thermophilus was an issue until we recognized that that was likely a contributing factor. Just stopping that one supplement alone, his PANDAS symptoms, his OCD, his anxiety disappeared. I have seen that happen now with other kids and other people as well. So it is one of the things that I look at clinically is if streptococcus thermophilus is being used in a supplement, that is one thing I look to remove.

PANDAS

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Autism Treatment – Thyroid Evaluation and Autism

Posted on 08 January 2012 by admin

Thyroid Evaluation and Autism

The thyroid gland is an important gland in our body with respects to metabolism. It really helps with energy production throughout the body. Whether it’s our immune system, our cardiovascular system including our heart, or our lungs, bones, gut, or brain, without good thyroid output, we tend to run deficits in energy production. In many kids on the Autism spectrum, we know that there are underlying medical problems which contribute to many of their issues. We know that research points to the fact that there are methylation chemistry problems which can affect attention and focusing, we know there are mitochondrial imbalances with can influence negatively metabolism throughout the body and energy production as well. We know that there can be immune system imbalances, digestive problems, and more.

One of the things that doesn’t get a lot of attention is thyroid imbalances. The thyroid is often either not assessed or under assessed with respect to Autism. In patients with various mental health problems, like depression or bipolar disorder, many times thyroid dysfunction is a contributing factor and often optimizing thyroid function helps to really improve the overall mental and physical health status of patients. It’s important to be aware of the importance of thyroid function in Autism as something to assess for your child’s overall health.

If you are doing a blood chemistry test or any type of blood testing for your child, make sure that your doctor includes a thyroid panel. Specifically, look at TSH, or thyroid stimulating hormone, free T4, and free T3. These are important because the free fraction of those hormones, specifically free T3, is what is acting physiologically at the cellular level. You can also add what is called a reverse T3. If the body is producing a lot of reverse T3, it will actually inhibit thyroid function as well, and that can often go undiagnosed.

As an Autism Specialist, I like to see the free T4 and free T3 in the upper 2/3rds of normal in its reference range. If they are low, I recommend using a natural thyroid such as Westhroid or Armour Thyroid to try and replenish thyroid function. That is not something necessarily we do forever, but sometimes 6 months to a year just to see if we can re-establish thyroid function. Often times, it helps with energy, brain function, cognitive function and even growth.

So again, the thyroid is something important to assess and I recommend that any parent who is having their child be assessed by a physician with respects to blood work make sure you include a thyroid panel, free T4 and free T3. A couple other things that you could add to that panel to rule out that an auto-immune process may be occurring is something called anti-TPO and an anti-thyroid globulin antibodies. If there are antibodies being produced to the thyroid gland, then that indicates that there is some type of auto-immune process that is likely affecting the thyroid adversely. Including these elements would be a complete thyroid panel. But minimally the TSH, free T3 and free T4 are critically important to look at.

Thyroid

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Helicobacter Pylori and Autism – What Tests to Perfom

Posted on 20 November 2011 by admin

Helicobacter Pylori

Helicobacter Pylori, or what is called H. Pylori, is a bacteria that has been responsible for the development of stomach ulcers. We know that kids on the Autism spectrum seem to have a lot of gut problems, including bacterial imbalances, yeast problems, and digestive problems in general. Helicobacter Pylori typically tends to aggravate the stomach and alters stomach acid production which can affect digestive enzyme function in the small intestine. It leads to poor digestion and malabsorption, and can also be a trigger for food allergies or sensitivities. It can cause stomach pain, acid reflux, gastritis and overall discomfort in the upper intestinal area, particularly after eating.

There’s a number ways of testing for H. Pylori. The most common test is called an H. Pylori antibody test, where they look at antibodies, which are immune proteins that are generated by our immune system to the presence of an infection, whether it’s a bacteria or a virus. The most common antibody is called an IGG antibody to H. Pylori. The problem is that IGG is only indicative of exposure to H. Pylori, and doesn’t really give you any idea if there is an active infection, so with that test, you still have to correlate it to symptoms. Some labs will also do an IGA and an IGM antibody to H. Pylori, which often times you have to specifically request. Those are important because IGM is actually a marker of active immune activity or immune activity against an active infection. IGA is also part of the complex as well. IGA, IGM and IGG are the common bloodtests that are done for H. Pylori. There is also a breath test that can be done, but it’s difficult to do with kids, so its not frequently used. Some of the labs are doing stool testing for H. Pylori, and are looking for what are called antigen staining or an antigen test.

One of the labs I use is called Biohealth Diagnostics and they have a panel called 401 which is a stool pathogen panel. When you add the H. Pylori component to it, it’s called the 401 H, it not only becomes a great test for parasites, looking for things like giardia, cryptosporidium, blastocystis hominis, entamoeba histolytica, but it also has a stool antigen test for H. Pylori and that if a stool antigen is present, it’s very good evidence that H. Pylori active infection is present. I often will do that, as an add-on stool test for kids on the autism spectrum to look for the presence of H. Pylori and also to look for the presence of other parasites that maybe missed by other stool tests. Those typically are the major tests that are done; the blood testing, the breath testing and the stool testing. The ones that are most common in the autism community would certainly be doing stool testing and the blood testing as well. I realize with some kids, it’s difficult to get blood, so again, if your doctors only gonna run H. Pylori IGG, in my experience that’s not going to be enough. Ask them to at least do the IGM, the IGA antibody and better than that, add a stool H. Pylori antigen test as well.

Helicobacter Pylori

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Autism Treatment – Helicobacter Pylori and Autism

Posted on 13 November 2011 by admin

Let’s talk about something called Helicobacter pylori and Autism or H Pylori. H. Pylori is a bacteria that has been responsible for the development of stomach ulcers. We know that kids on the Autism spectrum seem to have a lot of gut problems, including bacterial imbalances, yeast problems, and digestive problems in general. So, they seem to have a greater susceptibility of these types of infections, as well as susceptibility of behavioral problems associated with these infections whether it’s self stimulatory behavior that is driven by yeast, or aggressive behavior that is exacerbated by the presence of clostridia bacteria.

Helicobacter Pylori found in children on the Autism Spectrum typically tends to aggravate the stomach and alters stomach acid production which can affect digestive enzyme function in the small intestine. It leads to poor digestion, malabsorption, and can trigger food allergies or food sensitivities. It can also lead to stomach pain, acid reflux, gastritis and overall discomfort in the upper intestinal area, particularly after eating.

A lot of kids will actually avoid meat because it’s just hard to digest, and that can be an indicator that Helicobacter Pylori may be a problem. So I want you to think about Helicobacter Pylori as another type of infection that may be affecting your child’s digestive system and affecting the way they digest food.

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Autism Treatment – How to Successfully Work With a Biomedical Autism Doctor

Posted on 07 November 2011 by admin

Autism Treatment

These suggestions have been acquired over the years in my practice and have helped me assist my patients greatly. Also, in talking with many other doctors working with families of a loved one with autism these recommendations often hold true as well.

Autism Treatment Journal – keep a running journal of your observations and timeline of therapies you are implementing.

Keep a spreadsheet of therapies.

Keep dates of when new therapies such as when supplements were started, stopped, and what reactions you see (good or bad).

Recognize your child’s patterns – situational, seasonal, time of day.

If you add new therapies new problems occur, then cut out the therapies implemented after the reactions occurred, then reintroduce each therapy one at a time and slowly to isolate which one was the potential culprit. Notify your doctor of these changes.

You will need to become a detective of your child’s particular autism condition.

You know your child better than anyone – be involved 100%.

You are ultimately responsible for your own health and your child’s health care, and by keeping an Autism Treatment Journal, you can help your doctors to treat your child effectively. Be prepared for your consultations with questions, concerns, and important topics you want to cover. Ask whether your practitioner receives faxes, emails, or voice mail regarding questions.Send these to your doctor via fax or email prior to your consult.
Be prepared to pay for extra time. Most doctors will answer questions that are related to a new therapy introduced or quick follow-up questions to a recent visit.

Partnering with your practitioner also means having a relationship with the office staff. Treat them with respect. They are there to help. Do not assume your doctor remembers every detail about your child – keep them informed. If you change supplements by either removing or adding them, let your practitioner know in writing via fax or email. This way they can keep a copy for their records.

Come prepared with your latest observations about your child. Let your doctor know what different therapies, testing, etc. you want to explore. Keep a running list of supplements, medications, calendar of therapy implementation and observed reactions to therapies.

Let your doctor know when you have sent off tests or if you are having problems getting tests samples collected. Some offices track follow-up appointments based on incoming tests results.

Autism Treatment

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Autism Treatment–Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD)

Posted on 17 October 2011 by admin

Specific Carbohydrate Diet

Some children, particularly those with inflammatory bowel conditions, very weak immune systems, or the inability to eradicate opportunistic bacteria and yeast from their digestive system, often times will receive benefit from a more detailed autism treatment dietary program than just the gluten and casein-free diet. One such autism treatment program is called the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) as promoted by the late Elaine Gottschall, author of a groundbreaking book titled “Breaking the Vicious Cycle.” This diet is an extension of the gluten/casein-free diet (and soy-free diet) and has been a big boost health wise for many children on the autismspectrum.

I have seen the Specific Carbohydrate Diet work miracles with patients with digestive conditions such as Ulcerative Colitis or Chron’s Disease. Many children on the autism spectrum are suffering with a similar condition called Autistic Entereocolitis as described by Andrew Wakefield, M.D. Many more kids are suffering with undiagnosed bowel disorders that benefit from the Specific Carbohydrate Diet.

The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) is not just a low carbohydrate diet, but instead is focused on removing certain grains such as wheat, barley, rye (same as the GF/CF diet), as well as rice, corn and other offending foods. The theory is that certain digestive enzymes that breakdown disaccharides (complex sugars) are missing (or are being blocked from reaching the food in the digestive system by excessive layers of intestinal mucus) in the child’s digestive system, making it difficult to digest these additional food sources. The lack of digestive function leads to chronic inflammation in the digestive system leading to gut wall deterioration. With the breakdown of the gut wall, food absorption is compromised leading to mineral, amino acid and vitamin imbalances, as well as immune dysfunction and the overgrowth of opportunistic infections such as yeast and bacteria.

The digestive system is the largest immune organ in the body and acts as the first line ofimmune defense against pathogens such as parasites, yeast, bacteria and intestinal exposed viruses. The loss of this immune response and the eventually breakdown of the gut wall can lead to systemic immune dysfunction and leaky gut. “Leaky gut” is analogous to a screen door on a submarine – “everything and anything can get through.” This means you lose the ability to keep the bad stuff from entering your blood stream. Increased toxins filtering into your child’s blood stream can activate systemic immune responses leading to local and systemic inflammation – including the brain. Celiac disease (which is a genetic disorder evidenced by the inability to digest gluten – specifically gliadin – containing grains) is an example of this where gluten proteins from food can adversely affect the brain.

To learn more about this autism treatment approach – the Specific Carbohydrate Diet -and the benefits it may have for your child visit – www.breakingtheviciouscycle.com

Specific Carbohydrate Diet

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Autism Treatment – Dietary Treatment Options for Autism Treatment

Posted on 16 October 2011 by admin

Autism Treatment

There are a number of dietary interventions that are helpful for individuals on the autism-spectrum. These include the gluten and casein-free diet (GF/CF), the Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD), Low Oxalate Diet (LOD), Feingold, GAPS, and anti-candida. Deciding on which Autism Treatment diet is right for your child can be confusing. How do you know where to start? Which Autism Treatment protocol do I do? Which one is best? All of these are common questions, but sometimes difficult to answer. In my experience there, is no one diet that is right for every person – certainly not every autism-spectrum child. One size does not fit all. It is true that in the context of eating, the elimination of toxic foods such as processed grains, high fructose corn syrup, and trans fats is critical, and in doing so will go a long way in improving the health of your child. Let’s take a glance at one diet – The Body Ecology – as an Autism Treatment option.

Yeast is a major problem in autism. The biotoxins from yeast contribute to cognitive, behavioral and language difficulties. Working to reduce or eliminate yeast toxins is an important consideration for any person on the autism-spectrum. Autism Treatment programs such as the Body Ecology Diet help in attacking chronic yeast problems. Here is an overview of the Body Ecology Diet:

* Anti-candida diet by eliminating all fruits other than lemons, limes, dried cranberries, and black currant seed juice.
* Cultured vegetables which aide in proper digestion, normalizing intestinal beneficial bacteria levels and acid-alkaline balance.
* Using various kefir products which are a good source of protein.
* Using a wide variety of protein meats, vegetables, and certain non-gluten (gliadin) grains (quinoa, amaranth, millet and buckwheat).
* Vegetable juices for increased nutrient bioavailability.
* Proper food combining to reduce digestive problems such as bloating, gas, and yeast overgrowth, etc.

The benefits derived from the Body Ecology program are a reduction in yeast overgrowth (and other opportunistic intestinal “gut bugs” such as bacteria and parasites), reduced exposure to harmful sugars, proper digestion, stronger immune function and less food allergies.

The Body Ecology Diet is a good example of how a more whole food diet (with the incorporation of fresh fruits and vegetables, organic meats, and healthy grains), and the elimination of fast foods can have wide-sweeping positive effects on your child’s health by reducing many of the artificial food ingredients, sugars and toxic fats that plague so much of the typical American diet.

Autism Treatment

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Autism Treatment – Using Methylation Chemistry for Autism Treatment

Posted on 02 October 2011 by admin

Methylation is a vital biochemical reaction in the body that supports the cardiovascular, hormone, immune, and detoxification systems, DNA/RNA structure and function, and other key metabolic system controlling energy production. It is commonly a problem in many autistic-spectrum individuals. There are some effective therapies, namely methylcobolamin therapy (injection, oral, sublingual), as well as other methylation supplements such as DMG and TMG.

The two most referenced chemical reactions in this methylation system are Re-methylation and Trans-Sulfuration.

Re-Methylation (or methylation) – this pathway involves the conversion of Homocysteine to Methionine. Methionine is a rate-limiting step for the production of other necessary chemicals which affect the heart and blood vessels, muscle tissue, immune and nervous system. The conversion of homocysteine to methionine can occur by direct transference of a methyl (CH3) groups from Methylcobalamin (B12) or betaine (trimethylglycine or TMG).

Homocysteine sits at a junction of two different biochemical reactions. Because of its position in this biochemical matrix it has the capacity to impact all methylation and sulfur group transference metabolic processes in the body. The most recognized impact of homocysteine is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease. However, in individuals with autism its impact affects other functions as well particularly cognition including concentration, attention, and language.

Trans-Sulfuration – this pathway involves degrading homocysteine to two different amino acids – taurine and cysteine. Taurine is most commonly known for cardiac support and liver support, detoxification, bile acid formation and cholesterol excretion. Cysteine has direct influence on glutathione production. Glutathione is a potent anti-oxidant and has broad reaching effects on the DNA/RNA protection, heavy metal detoxification, and immune function. Many children on the autistic-spectrum have deficiencies of both taurine and cysteine.

There are many intermediary steps involved in these two important biochemical reactions. Envision a wheel that is constantly spinning in a clockwise fashion. Homocysteine is at 6 o’clock and Methionine is at 12 o’clock. The goal is to get from 6 o’clock to 12 o’clock, and then from 12 o’clock to 6 o’clock. This keeps the wheel spinning in the right direction. Certain other chemicals will impact upon this wheel at specific points. If any one of these intermediary steps is blocked than the wheel slows down or stops. This causes a backlog of chemical information that has deleterious effects on our overall health.

Methylcobolamin, activated Folic Acid (called methyl-folate), and Betaine (TMG) are responsible for taking homocysteine from 6 o’clock to methionine at 12 o’clock. If one system is faulty (methylcobolamin/Folic acid) than betaine (TMG) can help out. SAMe (s-adenosylmethionine) the body’s “universal methyl donor” helps take methionine from 12 o’clock to homocysteine at 6 o’clock. Along the way other important chemicals are being spun off in different directions to support the many dependent biochemical reactions in the body.

The problem with many autistic individuals is that this system does not operate properly severely compromising their immune, nervous, and detoxification systems. The impact can be enormous including increased chronic infections, inability to detoxify their body of chemicals and heavy metal toxins, and neuro-cognitive problems such as language processing, attention, focusing, and concentration. There appears to be a genetic component with many autistic individuals for having a problem with this methylation and trans-sulfuration chemisty. However, for many the problem does not become manifest until their system is negatively impacted upon from nutritional deficiencies, digestive problems from yeast, bacteria, parasites, malabsorption from digestive imbalances, heavy metal toxins from vaccines or environmental exposures.

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Autism Treatment – How Music Therapy Helps In Treating Autism

Posted on 11 September 2011 by admin

Musical therapy is gaining acceptance in the field of treatments for autism. Individuals on the autism-spectrum who receive music therapy will often have improvement in overall temperament and learning abilities. I recently saw a young boy who loved the Beatles. Hearing their music has helped with his behavior and willingness to communicate. Other individuals have responded in similar ways to other types of music. Music makes connections to the non-verbal part of our brain making it a perfect therapy for disorders in which the person has trouble communicating. This is why it is a perfect fit for autism.

Music therapy has been used in conjunction to help with learning skills. Classical music often playing in the background has been shown to help with mental processing for math and complex problems, but more importantly in autism music in general provides a non-threatening medium for people while playing games that help to improve social and behavior skills. For example, by encouraging eye contact while singing or using musical instruments that need to be held close to the face musical therapy can help autistic individuals break social barriers. In short, music is fun and engaging.

The main thing that music therapy has been shown to help with is the development of speech and communication skills. Music has the ability to connect the verbal and non-verbal functions in the brain. This is critical in autism as speech difficulties are so significant. In the beginning certain individuals may be only able to hum, grunt or make non-word noises while others will babble phrases of verses. The little boy who was a Beatles fan learned to pronounce the famous line “we all live in a Yellow Submarine…” Autistic individuals will often gain the capability to put phrases and sentences together in attempts to communicate with other people. No matter how skilled the individual is with speech, they can participate in musical therapy by clapping to the beat of the song, humming along, or doing simple echoing sounds. It doesn’t really matter just getting them involved in music can make powerful transformations.

Individuals on the autism spectrum are commonly found to be good at music. Some people have perfect pitch, while others may play a particular instrument very well. Even if they show no genius musical ability by common standards you may find that a particularly person has abilities in music that exceed his or her other abilities. A musical therapist can use music as a way to link this kind of learning with other kinds of learning skills such as communicating emotions or improving memory. Trained professionals can use music to teach children and others how to communicate in nonverbal ways, making it easier for patients to learn.

However, music doesn’t need to be reserved for a therapy or a classroom setting. Play music in the home and/or car as a way to introduce new sounds, instruments, and voices into the auditory world for an autistic individual. Break out those Beatles albums and you never know what might emerge for a person on the spectrum. They too may find their favorite Beatles song and learn to sign and communicate in a way they never have before.

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