Archive | September, 2012

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Biomedical Autism Treatment – Biomedical Education and Autism Seminars on Demand

Posted on 05 September 2012 by admin

I wanted to make everyone aware that my previous webinars, particularly webinars that have dealt with Methyl B-12 therapy, Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy, supplement therapy, yeast, biofilms, cerebral folate deficiency, brain inflammation, understanding brain regions and Autism and a host of other topics are now available for immediate viewing at a new website called Autism Seminars on Demand (www.AutismSeminarsOnDemand.com). What we did is we went back and re-recorded these presentations in their entirety with professional audio and synchronized them with the presentation slides. Many of them an hour, an hour and fifteen to an hour and a half long, packed full of information. These are immediately available for viewing on Autism Seminars on Demand (www.AutismSeminarsOnDemand.com). You can also have access as a downloadable file, the actual slide presentations from my previous webinars. So if you are looking to further your knowledge with respects to biomedical intervention to help your child, to help your grandchild, a family member or a friend, it is a great place to access this information. Again that is www.AutismSeminarsOnDemand.com.

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Biomedical Autism Treatment – Take Supplements With Caution

Posted on 04 September 2012 by admin

If you are about to start supplements with your child who is on the Autism spectrum, take my word of advice, don’t start everything at once. If you’ve got a list of supplements from your doctor, whether it is 3 items, 5, 10, my recommendation and my clinical experience in years of practice is start one thing at a time, particularly in the beginning of any type of biomedical program. And the reason is, many kids on the Autism spectrum are very, very sensitive, physically, mentally, emotionally to therapy. If you start everything at one time you’re not necessarily going to know what is working or what may be causing a problem. Not that we’re talking about serious side effects from supplement therapy but you want to be able to know how well they’re adjusting, how well they are progressing to a particular therapy.

Now what is going to happen over time is your kids are going to be on multiple things. They are going to be doing dietary intervention, they will be on supplement therapy, maybe they’re treating for yeast, maybe you’re doing Methyl B-12, whatever it may be. But in the beginning I always try to isolate down and start one thing at a time. B-12 for example, Methyl B-12 injections is a perfect example of this. We would like to start this for at least 5 to 6 weeks, ideally 6 weeks, without starting any other therapy. If I am going to start supplements and I have 5 or 6 things, I will typically tell the parent and give them a list of where I want them to start and they start at the top of the list and work our way down. Typically introducing a new supplement every 1 to 2 days because I want to know and I want them to give me feedback on positive changes as well as negative changes. I also have parents get a little notebook calendar where they can mark down what day they started a therapy or a supplement and make a little note as to what they observed. So, again if you rush into it and you start too many things at once and your child has a negative reaction you’re not going to know did it. Be patient, start one thing at a time and you will have much greater success long term in doing supplement therapy and other biomedical therapies for your child.

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Autism Treatment – Age Appropriate Behavior or Autism?

Posted on 04 September 2012 by admin

One of the things I’ve seen in practice over the years is when parents try to figure out with their child is the behavior they are seeing related to Autism or is it age appropriate. If you are a parent who has a neurotypical child that may be older than your Autistic son or daughter you’ve got some kind of reference point to look back on. How did they develop? How did they progress? At what age were you starting to see certain behaviors? You have to apply that to your Autistic child. If you are a parent who only has a child on the Autism spectrum and you don’t have another child in your family to reference to it can be a little more difficult because what you are trying to determine is is what you are seeing behaviorally somehow related to the neurological condition or is it just typical for kids that age.

What I recommend parents do is buy some books on childhood development. And there are a series of books that you can go to any book store and find these typically. And there are books that talk about age development from a certain age whether it is birth to two years or two years to five years. Depending on where your child is in age, whether they are 3, 4, 5 years old, and they are also on the Autism spectrum, is read about what is typical for kids that age because not everything is Autism. Some of it just may be the fact that they are a typical age and manifesting with age appropriate behavior.

One other tidbit of information I want to give you is when you start implementing a therapy, whether it is biomedical therapy and sometimes non biomedical therapies, speech therapy, behavioral therapy, etc. many times kids on the spectrum come out of their fog so to speak. And they start becoming more aware of what is around them. The environmental awareness increases so even though they may be age 5, they might now be manifesting with behavior of a 3 year old or 3 ½ year old. I’ve seen kids who were 6, 7 years old and being lifted out of this Autistic condition, and for many of them they become more aware, their speech is improved, their socialization improves, they have less anxiety but now they are doing some immature behavior because they haven’t quite caught up. So that has to be appreciated too. So think of that, think of that with respects to your kids, is the behavior you are seeing typical for Autism or just typical for their age?

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